fig

Do you want to grow your own fruits or nuts? Portland’s mild climate allows for many kinds of fruit and nut trees to be grown. Apples, Figs, Plums and Hazelnuts are just a few of the trees Portland Nursery offers every spring.

Orchard Planning

Our selection of fruit trees changes every year, so we post lists annually to help with planning. The list is based on orders that are confirmed by our growers, so they reflect our best estimate of what to expect. However, we don't always receive what is confirmed - there are often changes in root stocks and crop failures can occur. Only after orders arrive are we certain of our stock. 

We plant all of our fruit trees in pots, and do not offer bare-root fruit trees.

Fruit trees, berries and small fruits begin to arrive in January, and trickle in weekly through winter. Call to check if the varieties you have selected are available before making a special trip.

** Crop failures may cause shortages and we cannot guarantee all varieties to be available. Our fruit trees for 2017 arrive mainly in February-March, and often sell quickly. Please call ahead to confirm stock.

plum

Pollination

Some fruit trees are self-fertile. This means that they require only one tree to be planted in order to bear fruit. Many fruit trees are not self-fertile and should be planted with a compatible partner to ensure pollination and fruit. Compatible partners are a different variety of the same type of fruit.

Self-Fertile Fruit Trees

  • Almond*
  • Apricot*
  • Citrus (winter indoors)
  • Fig
  • Mulberry
  • Nectarine
  • Olive ‘Arbequina’
  • Peach*
  • Persimmon*
  • Plum – European

Fruit Trees requiring Pollinators

  • Apple
  • Cherry - some varieties are self-fruitful
  • Chestnut
  • Filbert
  • Olive ‘Leccino’
  • Paw Paw
  • Pears - Asian and European
  • Plum – Japanese
  • Walnut

*The varieties we stock are self-fertile. There are other varieties that require pollinators.


Fruit Tree Size

root stock size

Most fruit trees are grafted to roots (root stocks) that change the mature size. Apples, for instance are available on miniature, dwarf, semi – dwarf and standard root stocks that result in trees anywhere from 6’ tall to 35’ tall. Size is also influenced by the vigor of specific varieties.

Make sure when your are purchasing fruit trees to choose sizes that fit the available space.


Disease Control

Many fruit trees are prone to fungal problems in our wet climate. To protect against diseases there are a few simple guidelines to follow.

  • Clean up – rake up leaves in autumn and don’t leave fallen fruit on the ground to rot.
  • Spray with organic dormant spray at least once a year. Lime Sulfur and Copper sprays are commonly used by organic gardeners.
  • Insects can also be problematic. Organic solutions are specific to the type of fruit and the insects in question.

And if that’s not enough… Timing harvests, keeping the birds off and pruning are additional things to learn about when growing fruit trees. Fortunately Portland Nursery offers Fruit Tree Classes every spring.

Find the best Trees for your Garden

We carry a wide variety of trees year-round. These represent only a fraction of what you will find and are some of our favorites. Note: Viewing a Native Plant will take you into our Native Plant section.

Trees

Abies: The Fir Tree

Natives

Native Abies: Native Fir

Natives

Native Acer Circinatum:

Vine Maple
Trees

Acers for Fall Color

Trees

Acer palmatum: Japanese Maple

Trees

Bird Haven

Trees

Cercis: Redbud

Trees

Conifers

Trees

Cornus: Dogwood

Trees

Cryptomeria: Japanese Cedar

Trees

Fruit Trees

Trees

Ginkgo: Maidenhair Tree

Trees

Heptacodium: Seven Sons Flower

Trees

Lagerstroemia: Crape Myrtle

Trees

Larix: Larch Tree

Trees

Magnolia Trees

Natives

Malus fusca

Western Crabapple
Trees

Miniature Conifers

Trees

Oxydendrum: The Sourwood Tree

Trees

Picea: The Spruce Tree

Natives

Pinus: Native Pine

Trees

Planting Tips

Trees

Pruning Guide

Trees

Prunus: Cherries &
their Prunus relatives

Natives

Quercus: Garry Oak

Trees

Salix: Willow

Trees

Stewartia

Trees

Styrax: Japanese Snowbell

Trees

Tree Selection Guide