Corylus cornuta foliage

We truly missed the presence and availability of all hazelnuts for the decade or so beginning in the mid-1990s, when the virulent Eastern Filbert Blight made a serious threat to the orchards in the Willamette Valley, and resulted in quarantine of all Corylus, preventing their transport and sale.

Corylus cornuta
Corylus cornuta: Beaked Hazelnut

Time, careful application of specific fungicides and propagation of new, blight-resistant varieties eventually resulted in the successful level of control over the disease. Though the native Corylus is thought to not be susceptible to the disease, it was covered by the quarantine as a precautionary measure.

The straight species, Corylus cornuta, is native across much of the US and Canada, but it is the Corylus cornuta var. californica that is the more specifically native to the west coast, from California up into British Columbia, found in low-to-mid elevation woodlands on both sides of the Cascades.

Corylus cornuta
Corylus cornuta: Beaked Hazelnut

Corylus cornuta californica is a rounded, open and graceful deciduous shrub, growing 6-12’ tall and possibly wider, depending on how freely it is allowed to sucker and spread. In the winter, it is tinseled with long, creamy white catkins before the leaves emerge, and before any other woody plants are waking up, so that it is a beautiful and striking presence in the late winter garden.

The pollen from these catkins eventually drifts to the tiny red wisps of flowers that cling along the stems, which eventually become the pairs of edible hazlenuts covered in bright green husks that extend beyond the ends of the nuts in “beaks” that give the common name. The leaves that later emerge are oval to rounded, lightly toothed, similar in appearance to Alder or Birch leaves. In the autumn, they turn to yellow, occasionally to orange.

This is a good choice for a partly shady location that receives regular water, but that is also well-drained. Grow it in a large container or be sure to amend clay soil very well before planting.

Graceful, three-season-beautiful, edible to wildlife and humans alike, virtually pest and disease free and a size that is appropriate for most garden settings – we are so happy to be able to have it available again!

Find Natives for your garden

We offer a great selection of Northwest Natives from spring through fall. The plants featured are highlighted favorites, but they do not represent ALL of the plants we carry. For a more complete list, see our Northwest Native Plant List.

Natives

Abies: Native Fir

Natives

Acer Circinatum: Vine Maple

Natives

Actaea: Bugbane

Natives

Aquilegia: Columbine

Natives

Arbutus: Pacific Madrone

Natives

Asarum: Wild Ginger

Natives

Asclepias: Milkweed

Natives

Attracting Butterflies

Natives

Camassia: Camas

Natives

Ceanothus: Wild Lilac

Natives

Cornus sericea

Red Twig Dogwood
Natives

Corylus cornuta

Beaked Hazelnut
Natives

Dodecatheon: Shooting Star

Natives

Edible Fruits

Natives

Erigeron: Fleabane

Natives

Eriophyllum: Oregon Sunshine

Natives

Native Ferns

Natives

Fragaria: Wild Strawberry

Natives

Gaultheria shallon: Salal

Natives

Holodiscus: Oceanspray

Natives

Attracting Hummingbirds

Natives

Native Iris

Natives

Lewisia: Bitterroot

Natives

Mahonia: Oregon Grape

Natives

Malus fusca

Western Crabapple
Natives

Osmaronia: Indian Plum

Natives

Penstemon: Beard Tongue

Natives

Philadelphus: Mock Orange

Natives

Physocarpus

Western Ninebark
Natives

Pinus: Native Pine

Natives

Quercus: Garry Oak

Natives

Rhamnus: Cascara

Natives

Ribes: Wild Currant

Natives

Rosa: Wild Rose

Natives

Rubus: Salmonberry

Natives

Sambucus: Elderberry

Natives

Sedum: Stonecrop

Natives

Sidalcea: Checker Mallow

Natives

Sisyrinchium

Blue-eyed Grass
Natives

Solidago: Goldenrod

Natives

Symphoricarpos: Snowberry

Natives

Synthyris: Native Figwort

Natives

Trillium: Wake Robin

Natives

Vaccinium: Huckleberry

Natives

Vancouveria: Inside-out Flower

Natives

Viburnum trilobum

Cranberrybush
Natives

Viola: Violet

Natives

Winter Interest