Osmaronia

So, is it or Osmaronia or Oemleria? Best to be prepared to remember it by both names, for it is known by both names. Osmaronia is apparently a “generic” name that has become more widespread (in one source I also saw it listed as syn. Nuttalii cerasiformis, but I’m not going there…).

By whatever name, our native Indian Plum or Oso Berry is one of the heralds of spring in the woods west of the Cascades: this small tree / multi-stemmed shrub is a common understory plant in open forests, its small racemes of white flowers appearing anywhere from February to April, and will likewise be one of the first specimens to bloom in your garden.

It provides a welcome nectar source for hummingbirds and early pollinators, like our also native Orchard Mason Bees. But please don’t be tempted to cut a stem of these lovely little flowers to bring indoors; the smell has been likened to that of cat urine. Best to enjoy from a small distance and let the hummers and bees have their fill.

The leaves that follow the flowers are large and elliptical, and when crushed give off a scent similar to cucumber, much better than the flowers.

Unlike others in the Rose family, Osmaronia is dioecious – male and female flowers occur on separate plants – and so you would need both to obtain the “plum” of its common name. To the knowing eye, the difference between the male and female flowers can be observed; however most of the time the plants available in nurseries aren’t labeled as to gender (but they tend to be male).

Indian Plum

The fruit is small, with a relatively large pit, and opinion varies widely as to its palatability. This may help explain why more of them aren’t in commercial production. But, if you do happen to find yourself with a producing female Indian Plum, you will be rewarded with birds that will be attracted to your garden, for many bird species find the summertime fruit very much to their liking.

Osmaronia is a relatively fast growing shrub – or tree, if it is pruned to a single trunk. Its tendency is to sucker into a multi-stem shrub – growing to about 10’ to 15’ tall and 12’ or more wide. Its growth is more open than dense. It prefers dappled sun or a nice mix of sun/shade, though it will grow with more or less of both.

Amenable to conditions both moist and dry, it is an excellent choice to plant in the drier conditions beneath conifers. Once established it only occasionally needs supplemental water, and is reputedly pest and disease free.

All this makes it a great, low-maintenance and trouble-free candidate for the woodland and/or bird attracting garden.

Find Natives for your garden

We offer a great selection of Northwest Natives from spring through fall. The plants featured are highlighted favorites, but they do not represent ALL of the plants we carry. For a more complete list, see our Northwest Native Plant List.

Natives

Abies: Native Fir

Natives

Acer Circinatum: Vine Maple

Natives

Actaea: Bugbane

Natives

Aquilegia: Columbine

Natives

Arbutus: Pacific Madrone

Natives

Asarum: Wild Ginger

Natives

Asclepias: Milkweed

Natives

Attracting Butterflies

Natives

Camassia: Camas

Natives

Ceanothus: Wild Lilac

Natives

Cornus sericea

Red Twig Dogwood
Natives

Corylus cornuta

Beaked Hazelnut
Natives

Dodecatheon: Shooting Star

Natives

Edible Fruits

Natives

Erigeron: Fleabane

Natives

Eriophyllum: Oregon Sunshine

Natives

Native Ferns

Natives

Fragaria: Wild Strawberry

Natives

Gaultheria shallon: Salal

Natives

Holodiscus: Oceanspray

Natives

Attracting Hummingbirds

Natives

Native Iris

Natives

Lewisia: Bitterroot

Natives

Mahonia: Oregon Grape

Natives

Malus fusca

Western Crabapple
Natives

Osmaronia: Indian Plum

Natives

Penstemon: Beard Tongue

Natives

Philadelphus: Mock Orange

Natives

Physocarpus

Western Ninebark
Natives

Pinus: Native Pine

Natives

Quercus: Garry Oak

Natives

Rhamnus: Cascara

Natives

Ribes: Wild Currant

Natives

Rosa: Wild Rose

Natives

Rubus: Salmonberry

Natives

Sambucus: Elderberry

Natives

Sedum: Stonecrop

Natives

Sidalcea: Checker Mallow

Natives

Sisyrinchium

Blue-eyed Grass
Natives

Solidago: Goldenrod

Natives

Symphoricarpos: Snowberry

Natives

Synthyris: Native Figwort

Natives

Trillium: Wake Robin

Natives

Vaccinium: Huckleberry

Natives

Vancouveria: Inside-out Flower

Natives

Viburnum trilobum

Cranberrybush
Natives

Viola: Violet

Natives

Winter Interest