physocarpus

If you have a naturally-moist area of your garden with space for a largish shrub to settle in and make itself at home, the Pacific Ninebark might be the perfect choice.

In the wild it can be found along stream banks, at the edge of moist woodlands and wetlands; it will indeed languish if allowed to get too dry.

Pacific Ninebark

The clusters of flower buds, with their reddish-pink hue, open to reveal near spheres of tightly packed, tiny white flowers from April to July. What follows are pinkish-brown seed coats that tend to remain on the plant throughout the year, adding more contrast and texture (along with the peeling bark) for winter interest.

Slightly crinkled, dark/bright green lobed leaves, reminiscent of currant or maple, is a beautifully textured contrast against that of the reddish-brown, shredding bark.

Pacific Ninebark

The multi-stemmed nature of Physocarpus will create a graceful, slightly arching thicket, perfect for a mixed hedgerow or natural, wooded area attractive to birds, providing a good source of cover and protected nesting sites. The upright, graceful shape can be further emphasized by pruning, helping to keep the plant's tendency to sometimes become straggly in check, keep it more full and lush. Its extensive root system also makes it good for those situations needing erosion control, slope or along a waterway.

Aside from occasional pruning and assurance of sufficient moisture, Ninebark needs little else in the way of care. Virtually pest and disease free, though on occasion it can be troubled by aphids or powdery mildew.

Find Natives for your garden

We offer a great selection of Northwest Natives from spring through fall. The plants featured are highlighted favorites, but they do not represent ALL of the plants we carry. For a more complete list, see our Northwest Native Plant List.

Natives

Abies: Native Fir

Natives

Acer Circinatum: Vine Maple

Natives

Actaea: Bugbane

Natives

Aquilegia: Columbine

Natives

Arbutus: Pacific Madrone

Natives

Asarum: Wild Ginger

Natives

Asclepias: Milkweed

Natives

Attracting Butterflies

Natives

Camassia: Camas

Natives

Ceanothus: Wild Lilac

Natives

Cornus sericea

Red Twig Dogwood
Natives

Corylus cornuta

Beaked Hazelnut
Natives

Dodecatheon: Shooting Star

Natives

Edible Fruits

Natives

Erigeron: Fleabane

Natives

Eriophyllum: Oregon Sunshine

Natives

Native Ferns

Natives

Fragaria: Wild Strawberry

Natives

Gaultheria shallon: Salal

Natives

Holodiscus: Oceanspray

Natives

Attracting Hummingbirds

Natives

Native Iris

Natives

Lewisia: Bitterroot

Natives

Mahonia: Oregon Grape

Natives

Malus fusca

Western Crabapple
Natives

Osmaronia: Indian Plum

Natives

Penstemon: Beard Tongue

Natives

Philadelphus: Mock Orange

Natives

Physocarpus

Western Ninebark
Natives

Pinus: Native Pine

Natives

Quercus: Garry Oak

Natives

Rhamnus: Cascara

Natives

Ribes: Wild Currant

Natives

Rosa: Wild Rose

Natives

Rubus: Salmonberry

Natives

Sambucus: Elderberry

Natives

Sedum: Stonecrop

Natives

Sidalcea: Checker Mallow

Natives

Sisyrinchium

Blue-eyed Grass
Natives

Solidago: Goldenrod

Natives

Symphoricarpos: Snowberry

Natives

Synthyris: Native Figwort

Natives

Trillium: Wake Robin

Natives

Vaccinium: Huckleberry

Natives

Vancouveria: Inside-out Flower

Natives

Viburnum trilobum

Cranberrybush
Natives

Viola: Violet

Natives

Winter Interest